Monday, June 18, 2007

My favoriteee!

Unfortunately, I don't have any great stories about pancakes. They aren't anything especially exciting, in fact, they are pretty commonplace. I know that most people who make pancakes enjoy them for breakfast, but I usually make them for lunch or even dinner instead, sometimes with some scrambled tofu. Not too long ago, I experimented with some buckwheat flour while making pancakes, and I've used it every time since. I really love the smell of the buckwheat and the very slight grittiness it adds to the pancakes. Unfortunately the addition of the buckwheat flour does cause the batter to turn a sandy, gray color, which some people find kind of yucky. But since I think these pancakes are delicious, I don't mind at all.



Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes
Serves 2-3

To make these pancakes, you'll need:
-1/2 c whole wheat pastry flour
-1/2 c buckwheat flour
-1 tsp baking soda
-1 tbsp ground flaxseed
-3/4 c (one six-ounce container) plain soy yogurt
-3/4 c soymilk
-a pinch each of salt, sugar, and cinnamon
-a couple of handfuls of blueberries

I don't bother mixing the wet and dry ingredients in separate bowls for this recipe. Just combine the dry ingredients in a bowl, mix to combine, add the wet, and stir the batter until everything is incorporated. Don't overmix! The batter will be thick and somewhat heavy due to the whole grain flours, and will need more time to cook than other pancakes. I usually spoon some batter onto the pan and place a handful of blueberries on top, instead of tossing the blueberries in the bowl with everything else and turning the mixture blue. After all, the color of these pancakes is weird enough already.

2 comments:

Celine said...

they look delicious!!! I don't think I have buckwheat flour in my pantry, and that's too bad.

marygrace said...

they aren't light and fluffy like traditional pancakes, but are definitely a nice change of pace if you are looking for something a little heartier. at whole foods at least, they sell small bags of buckwheat, spelt, etc. types of flours, which i find are a good size to experiment with.